Sound studio

Experimenting with Sound: How to Make Devotional Music



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Few people think of experimental, ambient and drone when considering what kind of music to make; however, for local musician Mythmaking, these genres have always spoken to him.

Mythmaking, aka Isaac Szeto, says his love for music dates back to his father. From his extensive record collection to giving Szeto a classical guitar in 6th grade, Szeto’s father planted his musical seeds early on.

“I was just starting from the history of rock. It was music that interested me at the time, and I taught myself to play, so I formed bands with kids from middle school and high school and so on,” Szeto explains. “And then I kept exploring.”

In 2020, Szeto released his first album under the name Mythmaking, titled The pit. He says that when he starts making a piece of music, he doesn’t know how it’s going to go.

“I have an emotion that maybe I’m trying to chase away,” he says. “Usually I think a song is over, for me, when I feel the emotion that I need to feel when I play it.”

This is reflected in the track lengths of some of the songs on The pit. The longest song on the album, Wells will follow you wherever you golasts just under 18 minutes.

Szeto’s creative process is also very personal.

“I always try to move or be interested. It’s not that I don’t consider other people, I like when my music resonates with other people,” he says. “It’s the most beautiful thing in the world when people come up to me after a show and tell me they’ve been touched, or I see they obviously were, but I’m not doing it for them. I do it for me.

An expert on the more technical side of the music-making process is James Stanley, owner, producer and engineer at Ghost iron studio. Although his favorite genres are more centered around punk and metal, Stanley hears all types of music in his studio.

“I like to see what the bands bring, the new technologies, the different techniques, the different genres,” he says. “It’s just great, especially the culture. You meet people from all over the world and it’s really cool to see how they see the music.

Stanley and Szeto recommend getting all your gear done before you hit the studio. That way, according to Stanley, you can make sure everything is polished and ready for release.

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Experimenting with Sound: How to Make Devotional Music

Few people think of experimental, ambient and drone when considering what kind of music to make; however, for local musician Mythmaking, these genres have always spoken to him.

Mythmaking, aka Isaac Szeto, says his love for music dates back to his father. From his extensive record collection to offering Szeto a classical guitar in 6th grade, Szeto’s father planted his musical seeds early on.

“I only started from the history of rock. It was music that interested me at the time, and I taught myself to play, so I formed bands with kids from middle school and high school and so on,” Szeto explains. “And then I kept exploring.”

In 2020, Szeto released his first album under the name Mythmaking, titled The Pit. He says that when he starts making a piece of music, he doesn’t know how it will turn out.

“I have an emotion that maybe I’m trying to chase away,” he says. “I usually think a song is over, for me, when I feel the emotion that I need to feel when I play it.”

This is reflected in the track lengths of some of the songs on The pit. The longest song on the album, Wells Will Follow You Everywhere You Golasts just under 18 minutes.

Szeto’s creative process is also very personal.

“I always try to get emotional or interested. It’s not that I don’t consider other people, I like when my music resonates with other people,” he says. the most beautiful thing in the world when people come up to me after a show and tell me they were touched, or I see they obviously were, but I’m not doing it for them. I do it for me.”

An expert on the more technical side of the music-making process is James Stanley, who is the owner, producer and engineer of Ghost Iron Studio. Although his favorite genres are more centered around punk and metal, Stanley hears all types of music in his studio.

“I love seeing what the bands bring, the new technologies, the different techniques, the different genres,” he says. “It’s just great, especially the culture. You meet people from all over the world and it’s super cool to see how they view the music.”

Stanley and Szeto recommend doing all your material before you go to the studio. That way, according to Stanley, you can make sure everything is perfect and ready to go.

This article first appeared on Calgary Newspaper and is republished here under a Creative Commons license.

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